1. mullitover:

    JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

    SIAN DAVEY: I wanted to be a farmer, entirely based on how happy I felt as a child visiting my parents friend’s farm.

    JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

    SD: Right now my inspirations are everywhere, I changed course on my photographic practice this summer to work less conceptually and practice being present with my surroundings and see where that takes me. This has opened up my practice removing boundaries and potential limitations, so right now its everything from my family light the work of I am inspired by many things, the work of Chris Killip, Paul Graham, Guido Guidi and anything by Diane Arbus.

    JC: What are you up to right now?

    SD: At the moment I am immersed in my new project Finding Alice, which is based upon both my relationship with Alice, my daughter and her place in the family. Through photographing my family I am attempting to show that regardless of what we come into the world with, we are all fundamentally in the same boat. It is only fear that separates us. In May I started photographing an air stewardess with BA. I’ll be flying on 10 long haul flights with her photographing the culture on board and the working life of staff. I am keeping the project as unformed as possible until I get a stronger sense of the narrative as the work progresses.

    JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

    SD: I moved from Brighton 3 years ago, having lived there for most of my adult life. Interestingly, perhaps with fewer distractions, my photography has really fallen into place since moving. I now photograph family and people in the local environment, as with the River project, which is all new territory for me. It’s exciting to find yourself in a completely new context and this inevitably provides a whole new set of tensions.

    JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

    SD: My mentors have always been those who are inspired, passionate and committed about their subject; I would include in that Mr Mc.Neal my English teacher at school, to my Tibetan Buddhist teachers and right now, from Plymouth University, Jem Southam and David Chandler and most recently, my daughter Alice.

    JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

    SD: Whatever you do in life if it must be for yourself. When thats the case then you will want to keep your practice going, because you believe in it. There are always going to be times when inspiration is low so just stay attuned to where you are and photograph it. Photography is about the intelligence of seeing, so keep taking pictures. I find exhibitions are always a great source of inspiration, as are audio lectures like the ICP website archive, and following photography blogs online.

    JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

    SD: There is no plan B, I have just given up my work as a psychotherapist.

    JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

    SD: Yes, which is why I choose to do an MA. I am continually inspired from listening to others, learning new ways of seeing - its so important to continually assess and reassess our position. Having a peer group that you can discuss work with is key.

    @mullitovercc

  2. archatlas:

    Geometrix Rupert Vandervell

  3. 5centsapound:

    Colin Delfosse: The PKK Amazons - Iraq, 2009

    Entrenched in the mountainous region of Qandil in Northern Iraq, women of all ages and social conditions, armed with Kalashnikovs, are fighting for their ideals. The movement of Free Women of Kurdistan (PAJK), born from a disagreement with the PKK (Kurdistan Workers Party), aims to offer an alternative model for Kurdish and Middle Eastern women. The PKK (considered as a terrorist organisation by the US and EU) influence does not decrease: the repression suffered by Kurds in the region have driven many young women to join the ranks of the guerrilla. Now, more than 2,000 female fighters, mostly from Turkey but also Syria, Iran, Iraq, and Europe, are going underground struggling for freedom and rights of Kurdish people.

  4. photojojo:

    Berlin based artist Sarah Illenberger has a knack for giving everyday objects completely new meanings. 

    In Tutti Frutti, Sarah transforms food from a market in Tuscany, Italy into delightfully witty sculptures. See the rest below! 

    Everyday Food Items Given Completely New Meanings

    via Everything With a Twist

  5. This summer, All Things Considered has been exploring what it means to be a man in America today — from a second look at popular notions of masculinity and men’s style, to attitudes toward women — and how all those ideas have shifted over time.

    There are few people more acquainted with those shifts than David Granger. In 17 years as editor-in-chief of the men’s magazine Esquire, Granger hasn’t just had a front-row seat to changing notions of manhood in America — he has taken an active role in helping to define them. The magazine, which purports to cover “Man at His Best,” has done so for more than 80 years.

    The Evolution Of The ‘Esquire’ Man, In 10 Revealing Covers

    Photo Credit: Courtesy of Esquire

  6. nprontheroad:

Breakfast. Nora Springs, IA.  Two rhubarb slices. In the middle a delicacy the Methodist church ladies call “Tri-berry”. The pies come from churches all over town. So it’s a multi-denominational pie stand.

NPR reporters Don Gonyea and Scott Horsely and Morning Edition editor Arnie Seipel are cycling across Iowa at RAGBRAI with many pie stops along the way. Be sure to follow their crazy trip on NPR’s On The Road tumblr. 

    nprontheroad:

    Breakfast. Nora Springs, IA.
    Two rhubarb slices. In the middle a delicacy the Methodist church ladies call “Tri-berry”. The pies come from churches all over town. So it’s a multi-denominational pie stand.

    NPR reporters Don Gonyea and Scott Horsely and Morning Edition editor Arnie Seipel are cycling across Iowa at RAGBRAI with many pie stops along the way. Be sure to follow their crazy trip on NPR’s On The Road tumblr

  7. photographsonthebrain:

la-beaute—de-pandore:

Wayne Lawrence
 ‘Orchard beach : The Bronx Riviera’

    photographsonthebrain:

    la-beaute—de-pandore:

    Wayne Lawrence

     ‘Orchard beach : The Bronx Riviera’

    (Source: waynelawrenceonline.com)

  8. nprglobalhealth:

Straightening Sisay’s Spine: A Twist Of Fate Saves A Boy’s Life
One dewy morning back in May 2013, a dozen children gathered in an elementary school courtyard to play soccer in Addis Ababa. Seven-year-old Sisay Gudeta stood alone on the balcony above them.
Sisay poked his head through the arms of a rusty, blue guard rail, staring down at his classmates as they kickedan empty plastic bottle across the pavement. The kids rarely ask him to play, Sisay says. They are afraid to touch him, afraid of the bump on his back that stretches out his neatly pressed school sweater.
"He is such a beautiful child," Sisay’s grandmother says. "I ask God what I did to do this to him."
For reasons unknown, thousands of children in Ethiopia suffer from congenital spine conditions so severe that humps grow from their backs. Their spines resemble flattened pancakes and roller-coaster tracks, says Dr. Rick Hodes, an American who runs the onlyspine clinic in Addis Ababa, a city of 3 million people.
Such extreme scoliosis cases are found in many poor countries. But Hodes thinks that lack of screening and access to basic medical care leaves Ethiopia with some of the worst spines in the world.
If not effectively treated, scoliosis can lead to permanent deformity, disc injuries and neurological damage. Here in the U.S., the National Institutes of Health recommends doctors use a brace to help straighten a child’s back when the spine curves more than 25 to 30 degrees. When the curve reaches more than 45 degrees, surgery is often needed.
Yet thousands of Ethiopian children receive no medical treatment for their scoliosis. In villages, a traditional healer may try to flatten the child’s back by pressing hot rocks to the skin. Others with twisted spines and humpbacks are ostracized or abandoned and left to die.
Continue reading and view a slideshow at NPR.
Photo: Sisay Gudeta, then age 7, sits on his bed at his home in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, May 2013. At the time, his spine curved about 120 degrees. Without surgery, Sisay’s scoliosis would have killed before age 18, doctors said. (Andrew Dickinson for NPR)

Definitely click through to see more of these stunning images.  -Emily

    nprglobalhealth:

    Straightening Sisay’s Spine: A Twist Of Fate Saves A Boy’s Life

    One dewy morning back in May 2013, a dozen children gathered in an elementary school courtyard to play soccer in Addis Ababa. Seven-year-old Sisay Gudeta stood alone on the balcony above them.

    Sisay poked his head through the arms of a rusty, blue guard rail, staring down at his classmates as they kickedan empty plastic bottle across the pavement. The kids rarely ask him to play, Sisay says. They are afraid to touch him, afraid of the bump on his back that stretches out his neatly pressed school sweater.

    "He is such a beautiful child," Sisay’s grandmother says. "I ask God what I did to do this to him."

    For reasons unknown, thousands of children in Ethiopia suffer from congenital spine conditions so severe that humps grow from their backs. Their spines resemble flattened pancakes and roller-coaster tracks, says Dr. Rick Hodes, an American who runs the onlyspine clinic in Addis Ababa, a city of 3 million people.

    Such extreme scoliosis cases are found in many poor countries. But Hodes thinks that lack of screening and access to basic medical care leaves Ethiopia with some of the worst spines in the world.

    If not effectively treated, scoliosis can lead to permanent deformity, disc injuries and neurological damage. Here in the U.S., the National Institutes of Health recommends doctors use a brace to help straighten a child’s back when the spine curves more than 25 to 30 degrees. When the curve reaches more than 45 degrees, surgery is often needed.

    Yet thousands of Ethiopian children receive no medical treatment for their scoliosis. In villages, a traditional healer may try to flatten the child’s back by pressing hot rocks to the skin. Others with twisted spines and humpbacks are ostracized or abandoned and left to die.

    Continue reading and view a slideshow at NPR.

    Photo: Sisay Gudeta, then age 7, sits on his bed at his home in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, May 2013. At the time, his spine curved about 120 degrees. Without surgery, Sisay’s scoliosis would have killed before age 18, doctors said. (Andrew Dickinson for NPR)

    Definitely click through to see more of these stunning images.  -Emily

  9. 99percentinvisible:

    Contact sheet montages

    A fun twist on well known landmarks. -Emily

    Photo Credit: Thomas Kellner via Beautiful Decay

  10. ted:

    5 fun facts about fireflies (aka your favorite summer bug):

    Fireflies mate for a full evening and spend the whole night together. Awwww.

    The lights you see from fireflies are courtship signals that males are sending to females.

    But firefly romance is risky business. “Femme fatale” fireflies seduce males, and then suck their blood to get chemicals for their own survival.

    Around 150 million years ago, the very first fireflies flew during the daytime and didn’t light up. Today, there are still some firefly species where only the females light up.

    The chemical that makes fireflies light up first evolved as a warning sign to ward off predators — and it tastes terrible. Don’t eat the fireflies, folks. 

    WATCH: The loves and lies of fireflies » 

    The quintessential summer story with great summery images. -Emily