1. 5centsapound:

    Colin Delfosse: The PKK Amazons - Iraq, 2009

    Entrenched in the mountainous region of Qandil in Northern Iraq, women of all ages and social conditions, armed with Kalashnikovs, are fighting for their ideals. The movement of Free Women of Kurdistan (PAJK), born from a disagreement with the PKK (Kurdistan Workers Party), aims to offer an alternative model for Kurdish and Middle Eastern women. The PKK (considered as a terrorist organisation by the US and EU) influence does not decrease: the repression suffered by Kurds in the region have driven many young women to join the ranks of the guerrilla. Now, more than 2,000 female fighters, mostly from Turkey but also Syria, Iran, Iraq, and Europe, are going underground struggling for freedom and rights of Kurdish people.

  2. photojojo:

    Berlin based artist Sarah Illenberger has a knack for giving everyday objects completely new meanings. 

    In Tutti Frutti, Sarah transforms food from a market in Tuscany, Italy into delightfully witty sculptures. See the rest below! 

    Everyday Food Items Given Completely New Meanings

    via Everything With a Twist

  3. This summer, All Things Considered has been exploring what it means to be a man in America today — from a second look at popular notions of masculinity and men’s style, to attitudes toward women — and how all those ideas have shifted over time.

    There are few people more acquainted with those shifts than David Granger. In 17 years as editor-in-chief of the men’s magazine Esquire, Granger hasn’t just had a front-row seat to changing notions of manhood in America — he has taken an active role in helping to define them. The magazine, which purports to cover “Man at His Best,” has done so for more than 80 years.

    The Evolution Of The ‘Esquire’ Man, In 10 Revealing Covers

    Photo Credit: Courtesy of Esquire

  4. nprontheroad:

Breakfast. Nora Springs, IA.  Two rhubarb slices. In the middle a delicacy the Methodist church ladies call “Tri-berry”. The pies come from churches all over town. So it’s a multi-denominational pie stand.

NPR reporters Don Gonyea and Scott Horsely and Morning Edition editor Arnie Seipel are cycling across Iowa at RAGBRAI with many pie stops along the way. Be sure to follow their crazy trip on NPR’s On The Road tumblr. 

    nprontheroad:

    Breakfast. Nora Springs, IA.
    Two rhubarb slices. In the middle a delicacy the Methodist church ladies call “Tri-berry”. The pies come from churches all over town. So it’s a multi-denominational pie stand.

    NPR reporters Don Gonyea and Scott Horsely and Morning Edition editor Arnie Seipel are cycling across Iowa at RAGBRAI with many pie stops along the way. Be sure to follow their crazy trip on NPR’s On The Road tumblr

  5. photographsonthebrain:

la-beaute—de-pandore:

Wayne Lawrence
 ‘Orchard beach : The Bronx Riviera’

    photographsonthebrain:

    la-beaute—de-pandore:

    Wayne Lawrence

     ‘Orchard beach : The Bronx Riviera’

    (Source: waynelawrenceonline.com)

  6. nprglobalhealth:

Straightening Sisay’s Spine: A Twist Of Fate Saves A Boy’s Life
One dewy morning back in May 2013, a dozen children gathered in an elementary school courtyard to play soccer in Addis Ababa. Seven-year-old Sisay Gudeta stood alone on the balcony above them.
Sisay poked his head through the arms of a rusty, blue guard rail, staring down at his classmates as they kickedan empty plastic bottle across the pavement. The kids rarely ask him to play, Sisay says. They are afraid to touch him, afraid of the bump on his back that stretches out his neatly pressed school sweater.
"He is such a beautiful child," Sisay’s grandmother says. "I ask God what I did to do this to him."
For reasons unknown, thousands of children in Ethiopia suffer from congenital spine conditions so severe that humps grow from their backs. Their spines resemble flattened pancakes and roller-coaster tracks, says Dr. Rick Hodes, an American who runs the onlyspine clinic in Addis Ababa, a city of 3 million people.
Such extreme scoliosis cases are found in many poor countries. But Hodes thinks that lack of screening and access to basic medical care leaves Ethiopia with some of the worst spines in the world.
If not effectively treated, scoliosis can lead to permanent deformity, disc injuries and neurological damage. Here in the U.S., the National Institutes of Health recommends doctors use a brace to help straighten a child’s back when the spine curves more than 25 to 30 degrees. When the curve reaches more than 45 degrees, surgery is often needed.
Yet thousands of Ethiopian children receive no medical treatment for their scoliosis. In villages, a traditional healer may try to flatten the child’s back by pressing hot rocks to the skin. Others with twisted spines and humpbacks are ostracized or abandoned and left to die.
Continue reading and view a slideshow at NPR.
Photo: Sisay Gudeta, then age 7, sits on his bed at his home in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, May 2013. At the time, his spine curved about 120 degrees. Without surgery, Sisay’s scoliosis would have killed before age 18, doctors said. (Andrew Dickinson for NPR)

Definitely click through to see more of these stunning images.  -Emily

    nprglobalhealth:

    Straightening Sisay’s Spine: A Twist Of Fate Saves A Boy’s Life

    One dewy morning back in May 2013, a dozen children gathered in an elementary school courtyard to play soccer in Addis Ababa. Seven-year-old Sisay Gudeta stood alone on the balcony above them.

    Sisay poked his head through the arms of a rusty, blue guard rail, staring down at his classmates as they kickedan empty plastic bottle across the pavement. The kids rarely ask him to play, Sisay says. They are afraid to touch him, afraid of the bump on his back that stretches out his neatly pressed school sweater.

    "He is such a beautiful child," Sisay’s grandmother says. "I ask God what I did to do this to him."

    For reasons unknown, thousands of children in Ethiopia suffer from congenital spine conditions so severe that humps grow from their backs. Their spines resemble flattened pancakes and roller-coaster tracks, says Dr. Rick Hodes, an American who runs the onlyspine clinic in Addis Ababa, a city of 3 million people.

    Such extreme scoliosis cases are found in many poor countries. But Hodes thinks that lack of screening and access to basic medical care leaves Ethiopia with some of the worst spines in the world.

    If not effectively treated, scoliosis can lead to permanent deformity, disc injuries and neurological damage. Here in the U.S., the National Institutes of Health recommends doctors use a brace to help straighten a child’s back when the spine curves more than 25 to 30 degrees. When the curve reaches more than 45 degrees, surgery is often needed.

    Yet thousands of Ethiopian children receive no medical treatment for their scoliosis. In villages, a traditional healer may try to flatten the child’s back by pressing hot rocks to the skin. Others with twisted spines and humpbacks are ostracized or abandoned and left to die.

    Continue reading and view a slideshow at NPR.

    Photo: Sisay Gudeta, then age 7, sits on his bed at his home in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, May 2013. At the time, his spine curved about 120 degrees. Without surgery, Sisay’s scoliosis would have killed before age 18, doctors said. (Andrew Dickinson for NPR)

    Definitely click through to see more of these stunning images.  -Emily

  7. 99percentinvisible:

    Contact sheet montages

    A fun twist on well known landmarks. -Emily

    Photo Credit: Thomas Kellner via Beautiful Decay

  8. ted:

    5 fun facts about fireflies (aka your favorite summer bug):

    Fireflies mate for a full evening and spend the whole night together. Awwww.

    The lights you see from fireflies are courtship signals that males are sending to females.

    But firefly romance is risky business. “Femme fatale” fireflies seduce males, and then suck their blood to get chemicals for their own survival.

    Around 150 million years ago, the very first fireflies flew during the daytime and didn’t light up. Today, there are still some firefly species where only the females light up.

    The chemical that makes fireflies light up first evolved as a warning sign to ward off predators — and it tastes terrible. Don’t eat the fireflies, folks. 

    WATCH: The loves and lies of fireflies » 

    The quintessential summer story with great summery images. -Emily

  9. skunkbear:

    Check out this video we made for NPR’s series on stress with animator Avi Ofer:

  10. nprmusic:

    Watch Brody Dalle, the former lead singer of The Distillers, perform a personal anthem, “Dressed in Dreams,” surrounded by chili-pepper lights

    All of the Field Recordings are gorgeous but this one is definitely a visual stunner. -Emily