1. Traditionally, water symbolizes life and renewal, but in Sierra Leone it is also a vehicle for epidemic and death — the focus of photographer Mustafah Abdulaziz's project “Water Is Gold,” which documents the causes and effects of the country's recent cholera outbreak.

    Last year, Sierra Leone experienced the worst cholera outbreak in its history, Abdulaziz writes for the Pulitzer Center, which funded his trip. There were 20,736 cases of cholera with 280 deaths since the beginning of 2012, he adds.

    Abdulaziz spent most of his time in and around Freetown, Sierra Leone’s capital, which, he writes, was “built to support less than half the current population of 2 million.” The slums are overcrowded, unsanitary and sprawling — the perfect breeding ground for the disease.

    Sierra Leone’s Water Of Life — And Death

    Photo Credit: Mustafah Abdulaziz

  2. (Photos By John Poole/NPR)

    In Haiti, Bureaucratic Delays Stall Mass Cholera Vaccinations

    The impending mass vaccination project aims to show that vaccinating against cholera is feasible in Haiti. It has never been done in the midst of an ongoing cholera epidemic. So far, more than 530,000 Haitians have fallen ill with cholera, and more than 7,000 have died.

    But the vaccination campaign is bogged down in bureaucratic red tape.

  3. Edison Charles, 19, contracted cholera early in 2011. Charles recovered but the cholera outbreak in Haiti is currently the worst ongoing episode in the world. See more faces of those touched by cholera and hear the story on NPR.org.  (Photos by Jason Beaubien/NPR)
— Becky 

    Edison Charles, 19, contracted cholera early in 2011. Charles recovered but the cholera outbreak in Haiti is currently the worst ongoing episode in the world. See more faces of those touched by cholera and hear the story on NPR.org.  (Photos by Jason Beaubien/NPR)

    — Becky