1. life:

In 1960, LIFE magazine assigned Eve Arnold, who died in January 2012 at the  age of 99, to document the days and nights of Malcolm X, the  controversial and intensely charismatic public face of the Nation of  Islam.

“I am always delighted by the manipulation that goes on between a  subject and photographer when the subject knows about the camera and how  it can best be used to his advantage, Malcolm was  brilliant in this silent collaboration.” 

The unspoken teamwork, in a  sense, that Arnold describes and celebrates went beyond simple access.  Instead, she remembers Malcolm X finding her subjects to photograph,  arranging shots and ensuring that she had interviews for the text.
read more here.

    life:

    In 1960, LIFE magazine assigned Eve Arnold, who died in January 2012 at the age of 99, to document the days and nights of Malcolm X, the controversial and intensely charismatic public face of the Nation of Islam.

    “I am always delighted by the manipulation that goes on between a subject and photographer when the subject knows about the camera and how it can best be used to his advantage, Malcolm was brilliant in this silent collaboration.”

    The unspoken teamwork, in a sense, that Arnold describes and celebrates went beyond simple access. Instead, she remembers Malcolm X finding her subjects to photograph, arranging shots and ensuring that she had interviews for the text.

    read more here.

  2. macdiva:

Worlds passed through her camera. Veiled women in the Middle East. The Imperial Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan in Texas, on a macramé chair cover. A street barber in 1960s Afghanistan. Political prisoners in Soviet psychiatric hospitals. Mothers and children the world over, from Cuba to New Jersey to the deepest Chinese countryside. She took peyote with the Navajo and photographed Vanessa Redgrave’s naked arse. She took pictures of Queen Elizabeth II, on the cusp of middle age, in turquoise beneath a rain-blanched sky. She shot Paul Newman, at an acting class – white socks and T-shirt, loafered feet on a chair, intense gaze.
If these sound like clichés of colour supplement reportage, that’s because she was one of those who invented those clichés
(Quote via Professional Photographer: Eve Arnold Profile Photo via tout ceci est magnifique: Mangano @ MOMA)

    macdiva:

    Worlds passed through her camera. Veiled women in the Middle East. The Imperial Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan in Texas, on a macramé chair cover. A street barber in 1960s Afghanistan. Political prisoners in Soviet psychiatric hospitals. Mothers and children the world over, from Cuba to New Jersey to the deepest Chinese countryside. She took peyote with the Navajo and photographed Vanessa Redgrave’s naked arse. She took pictures of Queen Elizabeth II, on the cusp of middle age, in turquoise beneath a rain-blanched sky. She shot Paul Newman, at an acting class – white socks and T-shirt, loafered feet on a chair, intense gaze.
    If these sound like clichés of colour supplement reportage, that’s because she was one of those who invented those clichés

    (Quote via Professional Photographer: Eve Arnold Profile
    Photo via tout ceci est magnifique: Mangano @ MOMA)