1. Anderson Desir, 9, shares a dream with many boys his age in the Dominican Republic: He wants to grow up and play baseball in la liga grande, otherwise known as American Major League Baseball.

    But there’s an important difference between Anderson and the 80 Dominican kids from his summer baseball league in San Pedro de Macoris: Anderson is Haitian.

    In a controversial decision last year, the Dominican Constitutional Court ruled that those born in the country are not citizens unless at least one parent is a legal resident.

    The decision could cause problems for Haitians living in the Dominican Republic, like Anderson, whose parents brought him here from Haiti shortly after he was born. However, the ruling especially affects an estimated 250,000 Haitian descendants born in the Dominican Republic, including Anderson’s two siblings — his sister Rosaura, 6, and his brother Mickael, 2.

    Who’s A Citizen? The Question Dividing The Island Of Hispaniola

    Photo Credit: Sarah Tilotta for NPR

  2. audiovision:

    After Haiti’s earthquake in 2010 images of death and destruction flooded into the media, but photographer Paolo Woods focused on a subject close to our heart — radios.

    Since 49% of the adult population of Haiti is literate, most people rely on local radio stations to get their local news, listen to kompa (traditional Haitian music) and figure out what’s going on in their community.

    It takes about $2,000 to start up a basic station, but that won’t get you broadcast as far as NPR; it’ll just reach your town.

    See more of Woods’ photos on KPCC’s AudioVision.

  3. These are some of the “then and now” images from NPR photographer David Gilkey. One of the first photojournalists to capture the grim aftermath of the quake, he traveled back to Haiti to revisit images he originally took in 2010.

    "I’m not out walking the streets looking for beauty in any of it," Gilkey said in 2010. "It’s not just reporting. It’s not just taking pictures. It’s: Do those products, do the visuals, do the stories — do they change somebody’s mind enough to take action?"

    Haiti Then And Now: 3 Years After The Quake

    Photo Credit: David Gilkey/NPR

  4. (Photos By John Poole/NPR)

    In Haiti, Bureaucratic Delays Stall Mass Cholera Vaccinations

    The impending mass vaccination project aims to show that vaccinating against cholera is feasible in Haiti. It has never been done in the midst of an ongoing cholera epidemic. So far, more than 530,000 Haitians have fallen ill with cholera, and more than 7,000 have died.

    But the vaccination campaign is bogged down in bureaucratic red tape.

  5. Edison Charles, 19, contracted cholera early in 2011. Charles recovered but the cholera outbreak in Haiti is currently the worst ongoing episode in the world. See more faces of those touched by cholera and hear the story on NPR.org.  (Photos by Jason Beaubien/NPR)
— Becky 

    Edison Charles, 19, contracted cholera early in 2011. Charles recovered but the cholera outbreak in Haiti is currently the worst ongoing episode in the world. See more faces of those touched by cholera and hear the story on NPR.org.  (Photos by Jason Beaubien/NPR)

    — Becky 

  6. If You Teach A Man To Photograph: Haiti, As Seen By Haitians
"When you see what Haitians think is beautiful to photograph, important, profound," [Maggie Steber] says, “you learn more about them than anything an outsider can show you. And they do it better because it is so intimate.”

    If You Teach A Man To Photograph: Haiti, As Seen By Haitians

    "When you see what Haitians think is beautiful to photograph, important, profound," [Maggie Steber] says, “you learn more about them than anything an outsider can show you. And they do it better because it is so intimate.”