1. Photo Credit: Claire O’Neill/NPR

    Believe it or not, there’s a lot of food involved in wet-plate photography. Egg whites (albumen) are used to make the glass plates adhesive to the light-sensitive chemicals. And one way to keep the plates from drying out after processing is to coat them in honey. It’s also physically demanding, so you get really hungry.

    These are the things I learned in the field with wet-plate photographer Todd Harrington. For the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam, we asked him to retrace the steps of Civil War photographer Alexander Gardner. We wanted to capture the same scenes with the same equipment — to see how things have changed. (Kind of like the nerd’s version of Dear Photograph.)

    Same Camera, Different Century: Capturing Civil War Sites, 150 Years Later

  2. Photo Credit: Todd Harrington and Library Of Congress
Today’s 150th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam got us thinking: What if Civil War photographer Alexander Gardner could revisit some of the original sites he photographed? If he used his equipment today, what would the images look like? That is: How have the landscapes changed — or stayed the same?
Re-Tracing The Steps Of A Civil War Photographer

    Photo Credit: Todd Harrington and Library Of Congress

    Today’s 150th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam got us thinking: What if Civil War photographer Alexander Gardner could revisit some of the original sites he photographed? If he used his equipment today, what would the images look like? That is: How have the landscapes changed — or stayed the same?

    Re-Tracing The Steps Of A Civil War Photographer